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Sahtumun (ee) “Low Bush Blueberry”

Pequot children were often sent out with berry picking baskets to collect these fruits which were eaten fresh, used for baking, or dried and preserved for later use. The fruits could also be crushed and used to make dye.

Edible

Lowbush blueberries, also known as wild blueberries, offer a delightful combination of taste and nutrition. Here are some of their health benefits:

Rich in Antioxidants: Lowbush blueberries are packed with antioxidants, which protect your body from free radicals. These unstable molecules can damage cells and contribute to aging and diseases like cancer. Blueberries contain anthocyanins, a group of flavonoid antioxidants that play a significant role in their health effects.

Nutrient-Dense:

A 1-cup serving of blueberries contains:
Fiber: 3.6 grams
Vitamin C: 16% of the Daily Value (DV)
Vitamin K: 24% of the DV
Manganese: 22% of the DV

Heart and Brain Health: Blueberries may help lower blood pressure, prevent heart disease, and improve memory. Their consumption is associated with cardiovascular well-being and cognitive function.

Low in Calories: Blueberries are low in calories, making them an excellent choice for health-conscious individuals. A whole cup contains only 84 calories, yet it’s rich in essential nutrients.

Medical

Reduced DNA Damage: Oxidative DNA damage is a natural part of life, occurring in every cell daily. It contributes to aging and diseases like cancer. Blueberries help reduce DNA damage, potentially protecting against these health issues.

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Pequot children were often sent out with berry picking baskets to collect these fruits which were eaten fresh, used for baking, or dried and preserved for later use. The fruits could also be crushed and used to make dye.
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Oak has many traditional and post-colonial contact uses. During the farmstead era of the 1700-1800s, oak was used for house framing and tool handles where other aspects like acorn foraging has continued since pre contact.